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06-Jul-2017 07:54

Whereas, Snickets sometimes even had a bit of grass down them... One thats been missed off is: Caffeling = Tired/Flagging/Lagging behind/Not able to finish etc. - Me ma used to say if I couldn't finish me snap or if I were yawning)Hi! The family are all from the East Riding and a lot of them still speak in broad dialect.

I know this is probably an old topic but just wanted to say how lovely it is to finally find the full poem about Mary going to church in her new bonnet, my gran (From Bradford) used to say it to me as a child and since she passed away I've wanted to get hold of the full poem, many thanks to Pam for putting it on here. I´m from Sweden, I am surprised to read that some of the Yorkshire words are the same as in swedish!!! I never heard the word thirsty before I was 8 years of age.2. It would be very nice if someone could settle a bet, there's a lot riding on it!!

")Allus towd..."a ginnel is a snicket wi` a roof on."Ginnels being covered entries leading through to backs of terraced houses or shops etc. The other was always in response to any question you asked which was Yak a bak o' Arram were they mak pigs o steel.

Lavvies (toilets) were 'down ginnel' (down the passage between the cottages) and squares of newspaper were neatly cut into 6" pieces and threaded onto string then hung on a nail at the back of the door. In my Yorkshire upbringing (1940s/50s) 'chelping' was more than just talking.

We would be told to 'stop chelping' when we started answering back'!

Here comes a list, some are similar in soundings, some also similar in spelling.bairn-child-BARN.berg-mountain-BERG.brant-steep-BRANT.beck-brook-BÄCK.dale-valley-DAL.fast-stuck-FAST.neb-nose-NÄBB(birds beak).skrike-cry,scream-SKRIK(a scream).sten-stone-STEN.stor-great-STOR.strand-shore-STRAND(beach).sup-drink-SUP(snaps). My wife (from Lancashire) thinks that the expression "Lick road clean wi' tongue" is an old yorkshire expression, I (from New South Wales) say that it has been introduced to the vernacular by Monty Python. Barnsley word 'gip' for urge or feel like being sick.

I wish i could explain more, but it was interessting reading, i just had to share. Seethee, often used to start a statement,eg 'seethee, al tell thee sumat tha dunt know'.

")Allus towd..."a ginnel is a snicket wi` a roof on."Ginnels being covered entries leading through to backs of terraced houses or shops etc. The other was always in response to any question you asked which was Yak a bak o' Arram were they mak pigs o steel.Lavvies (toilets) were 'down ginnel' (down the passage between the cottages) and squares of newspaper were neatly cut into 6" pieces and threaded onto string then hung on a nail at the back of the door. In my Yorkshire upbringing (1940s/50s) 'chelping' was more than just talking.We would be told to 'stop chelping' when we started answering back'!Here comes a list, some are similar in soundings, some also similar in spelling.bairn-child-BARN.berg-mountain-BERG.brant-steep-BRANT.beck-brook-BÄCK.dale-valley-DAL.fast-stuck-FAST.neb-nose-NÄBB(birds beak).skrike-cry,scream-SKRIK(a scream).sten-stone-STEN.stor-great-STOR.strand-shore-STRAND(beach).sup-drink-SUP(snaps). My wife (from Lancashire) thinks that the expression "Lick road clean wi' tongue" is an old yorkshire expression, I (from New South Wales) say that it has been introduced to the vernacular by Monty Python. Barnsley word 'gip' for urge or feel like being sick.I wish i could explain more, but it was interessting reading, i just had to share. Seethee, often used to start a statement,eg 'seethee, al tell thee sumat tha dunt know'.One that has confused me is 'eyup' I'm not sure if it's 'hello' or 'careful', could you enlighten me please? "By eck, it's black o'er wife's mothers." Meaning its a dark, rainy sky."If thas gunna do owt for nowt, mek sure tha does it for thissen" Meaning only do something for free if your going to do it for yourself."Happen as not an maybe" Meaning you're probably right.