Myanmar fuck buddis

28-Jul-2017 22:10

As one of the older generation, I have felt very conscious of my temerity in trying to write something on this subject which younger people might be willing to read.

In this connection, I am very grateful to Alan and Jacqui James for giving me the benefit of their criticism, a task for which they are doubly qualified, being both wise in the Dhamma and at the same time much closer in age to the younger generation who may read this.

The rules are voluntarily undertaken, and if a monk feels unable to live up to them, he is free to leave the Order, which is considered much more honorable than hypocritically remaining in the robe while knowingly infringing the rule.

There are four basic rules, infringement of which is termed Parajika or "Defeat," and involves irrevocable expulsion from the Order.

For the average lay person, the Third Precept is on exactly the same footing as the other four.

There is, in the Buddhist view, nothing uniquely wicked about sexual offenses or failings.

A bhikkhu, or fully-ordained monk in the Theravada tradition, has taken upon himself a set of 227 rules of conduct.

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In the first place, we must distinguish between the rules undertaken by Buddhist monks for their own conduct, and any guiding principles for lay people.Firstly, in common with all the other precepts, it is a rule of training.It is not a "commandment" from God, the Buddha, or anyone else saying: "Thou shalt not..." There are no such commandments in Buddhism.The same principle applies to the Mahayana schools and of course, to nuns in those schools where they exist.There is no such thing as a "married monk," though in certain schools, especially in Japan, a form of "quasi-monasticism" with married teachers who retain a form of ordination is permitted under certain conditions.

In the first place, we must distinguish between the rules undertaken by Buddhist monks for their own conduct, and any guiding principles for lay people.Firstly, in common with all the other precepts, it is a rule of training.It is not a "commandment" from God, the Buddha, or anyone else saying: "Thou shalt not..." There are no such commandments in Buddhism.The same principle applies to the Mahayana schools and of course, to nuns in those schools where they exist.There is no such thing as a "married monk," though in certain schools, especially in Japan, a form of "quasi-monasticism" with married teachers who retain a form of ordination is permitted under certain conditions.Thus we find the following formulation of what a man should avoid: He avoids unlawful sexual intercourse, abstains from it.